Beth Hart going solo at Union Chapel

Beth Hart has announced a rare, first-time solo concert at Union Chapel in Islington.

The intimate show, on 14 December 2015, follows the release of new album ‘Better Than Home’ and a successful UK tour earlier this month.

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Nick Cave: Push the sky away

Nick Cave  | Eventim Apollo | 2 May 2015

“Look at me now!” bellows Nick Cave during ‘Jubilee Street’, somewhat unnecessarily. That’s exactly what everybody in Hammersmith’s sold-out Eventim Apollo has done for the past 90 minutes, seemingly transfixed by the messianic troubadour’s every move.

There’s a reverential silence while he performs ‘The Mercy Seat’ alone on stage, his impassioned vocal of defiance and redemption backed by nothing more than the minor chords he beats out of the grand piano. There’s a thrust of hands clamouring for his chest as he leans in and, as per the lyrics of ‘Higgs Boson Blues’, suggestively asks the diehards congregated at his feet: “Can you feel my heart beat?” Even during a rare outing for the almost-forgotten ‘Black Hair’, there’s hushed singing along from the crowd, awestruck either by the maudlin ballad’s return to the set or Warren Ellis’ plaintive accompaniment on accordion.

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Dan Patlansky: Bring the world to its knees

Dan Patlanksy | The Borderline |  27 April 2015

The walls of The Borderline are lined with old performance photos of musicians who’ve gone on to sell out arenas and even stadiums. If his sold-out show is anything to go by, it won’t be long before Dan Patlansky’s picture is up there alongside Pearl Jam’s.

The South African uses the launch of his new album, ‘Dear Silence Thieves’, to showcase not only his natural talent as a virtuoso blues guitarist but also his ever-expanding skills as singer and songwriter. Case in point: the fiery funk of set opener ‘Backbite’ is a world away from the 12-bar blues he cut his teeth on – a concise, catchy radio hit-in-waiting. Here in the freedom of the live setting it plays out a little longer than the version on record, thanks to one of his signature searing solos that show off his chops (and accompanying facial gurning) without a trace of self-indulgence.

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Paul Simon and Sting: These are the days of miracle and wonder

Paul Simon and Sting | The O2 | 16 April 2015

Both started out in successful groups that split acrimoniously.Each has a failed Broadway musical to his name. And, uhm, their surnames start with ‘S’. Not much in common, then, between the quintessential ‘60s New York folk singer and a Newcastle milkman’s son born Gordon Sumner.

Doesn’t matter. Any real differences between Paul Simon and Sting suddenly seem irrelevant when, together, they open the set with a few of their biggest hits. And as they trade verses on songs like ‘Fields of Gold’ and ‘Mother and Child Reunion’, it’s obvious the odd couple share a mutual respect and back catalogues that are not insubstantial — or incompatible.

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Go back to the ’80s at Rewind Festival

Great Scott, Marty! It’s time to jump back in the DeLorean and return to the ‘80s as Rewind Festival returns for its seventh consecutive year.

This edition of the world’s biggest ‘80s festival, headlined by OMD on Saturday and Human League on Sunday, takes place from 21 August to 23 August 2015 at Temple Island Meadows, Henley-on-Thames.

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Beck: Where it’s at

| Beck | Roundhouse | 3 September 2014 |

Beck’s not one for standing still, his eclectic back catalogue leaping from hip-hop folk to psychedelic country via disco funk and indie rock. Tonight, in person, he’s equally mercurial, a livewire performer who, in the space of 75 minutes, embodies an aggressive punk kid (‘Novocane’), teen slacker (‘Loser’), tie-dyed fireside balladeer (‘Blue Moon’), sexed-up Prince circa 1982 (‘Debra’), foot-stomping busker-with-harmonica (‘One Foot In The Grave’), and roof-raising MC (the climactic finale ‘Where It’s At’). Without missing a beat. Or, seemingly, taking a breath.

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